Viennese Silver: Modern Design, 1780-1918

Ignaz Sebastian Würth, Chocolate pot of Emperor Joseph II, Vienna ca. 1780

Silver, ebony
Museen des Mobiliendepots, Vienna

b. 1746, Vienna
d. 1834, Vienna

Chocolate pot of Emperor Joseph II
Ignaz Sebastian Würth
Vienna ca. 1780
Ignaz Sebastian Würth, Chocolate pot of Emperor Joseph II, Vienna ca. 1780
Jakob Krautauer, Teapot, Vienna 1802

Silver, fruitwood
Asenbaum Collection
Photo credit: © 2003 Asenbaum

b. 1772, Vienna
d. 1845, Vienna

Teapot
Jakob Krautauer
Vienna 1802
Jakob Krautauer, Teapot, Vienna 1802
Josef Hoffmann, Mustard pot, Vienna 1902

Executed by Alexander Sturm & Company
Silver, glass (finial), glass inset
Asenbaum Collection
Photo credit: © 2003 Asenbaum

b. 1870, Pirnitz/Brtnice
d. 1956, Vienna

Mustard pot
Josef Hoffmann
Vienna 1902
Josef Hoffmann, Mustard pot, Vienna 1902
Koloman Moser, Sugar box, Vienna 1903

Executed by Adolf Erbrich for the Wiener Werkstätte
Silver, niello
Neue Galerie New York
Photo credit: Annie Schlechter

b. 1868, Vienna
d. 1918, Vienna

Sugar box
Koloman Moser
Vienna 1903
Koloman Moser, Sugar box, Vienna 1903
Josef Hoffmann, Five pieces from the “Flat Model” flatware service, ca. 1904-08

Crab fork, sardine server, pastry serving spoon, cheese knife, and butter knife
Executed by the Wiener Werkstätte
Silver
Private collection
Photo credit: David Schlegel

b. 1870, Pirnitz/Brtnice
d. 1956, Vienna

Five pieces from the “Flat Model” flatware service
Josef Hoffmann
Vienna ca. 1904-08
Josef Hoffmann, Five pieces from the “Flat Model” flatware service, ca. 1904-08
Photo collage of Wiener Werkstätte and Viennese Biedermeier silver objects

Design by Richard Pandiscio and Takaya Goto

Photo collage of Wiener Werkstätte and Viennese Biedermeier silver objects
1810-1905
Photo collage of Wiener Werkstätte and Viennese Biedermeier silver objects

Viennese Silver: Modern Design, 1780-1918

October 17, 2003-February 16, 2004

This groundbreaking exhibition presents objects that, through their refined functionalism and abstracted geometric form, anticipated the breakthroughs of Modernism. On display are more than 180 extraordinary objects of daily use. Comparing early nineteenth-century works with examples of twentieth-century design, it offers a fascinating look at Vienna's contribution to the development of modern decorative arts.

The exhibition begins with pieces commissioned by Hapsburg royalty and proceeds to trace the development of the Biedermeier and Wiener Werkstätte traditions. It concludes with objects by Josef Hoffmann and Koloman Moser, who brought Viennese silvermaking to new aesthetic heights. Viennese Silver is on view from October 17, 2003, to February 16, 2004. It has been organized in cooperation with the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna, where it will open in November 2004.